Girish Ananthanarayanan is an alumnus of Indian Institute of Technology, Madras and Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad. He moved from a corporate career at McKinsey & Company to being COO of Peepul, an education-focused non-profit. He is successfully leading the operations of this well-established organisation. Girish started by pointing out two problem statements that were discussed in the session: 1. Funding Cycle: Few criterias to look out for with regard to funding 2. How do things need to evolve, especially in this situation of COVID19? How can the NGOs go back to funders and talk to them about the shift in programs? With the current situation of COVID19, pandemic and lockdown, society as we know it is undergoing a transformation. It is evident that everything we do and decide now would have a lasting impact. It is necessary to engage in activities that are a priority right now rather than
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Karthik Jayakumar is the Founding Partner of K Legal Firm based in Chennai. He completed his law degree at the School of Excellence in Law and has extensive experience in corporate transactional matters including mergers and acquisitions, legal advisory for start-ups, private equity, joint ventures and other services Karthik started the session by explaining the proposed CSR draft amendment and its implications forthe social sector. Definition of CSR Karthik explained that the proposed amendments define Corporate Social Responsibility more inclusively, specifying particular exceptions. These exceptions are as follows: Activities undertaken in the normal course of business of the company Any activity undertaken by the company outside India Contribution of any amount directly or indirectly to any political party Activities that significantly benefit the employees of the company and their families Definition of CSR policy CSR policy refers to a statement containing the approach and direction for selection, implementation, and monitoring
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David Nash is the Senior Flood Resilience Alliance Manager of Z Zurich Foundation. Prior to this, he was the CEO of Banyan, a well-respected organisation in Chennai working in the mental health space. He is also a mentor at AuxoHub. David Nash started the session by pointing out the effects of quarantine and lockdown around the world,touching upon how worries about income were becoming increasingly important to the general population. He flagged off the effect that this struggle would have on the social sector, recognising that the first impact would likely be on the inflow of donations. Given the reduction in disposable income amongst the generation population, charitable donations would likely see a fall. According to Nash, social sector organisations would face several challenges due to the current situation: Drying up of resources While many organisations have support from institutional donors and government funds, the reduction in individual supporters could
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Over the last couple of years, I have developed a deep sense of passion for work in social change and development; be it education, peace-building, or equality. When an opportunity came my way to work as an external consultant for AuxoHub, an organisation that looks at providing support services to actors in the social sector and works with NGOs as well as corporates, I was immediately excited (although it wasn’t exactly something I had done before). During the course of my initial interactions with the team at AuxoHub, I was introduced to the organisation’s work, brought up to speed on previous projects and given more details about the project I would be working on. I was struck by how meaningful and impactful the work is. It also made me realise that, in order to bring about social development, we needed players working together in different areas. Companies like AuxoHub bridge
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Social sector organisations in India are committed to doing great work on ground. Many work closely with their intended beneficiaries engaging with multiple stakeholders– coordinating between the communities they work with, the government, and other partner organisations– all the while ensuring that they do not drop the ball on administrative and funding activities. Juggling these activities is not only daunting but also becomes more challenging for a fledgling organisation with limited staff. Image credits: Chris Teresa Varghese, St. Xavier’s College To an organisation which is already short-staffed and struggling to do good work while staying afloat, the idea of monitoring projects or evaluating them after completion can become the straw that breaks the camel’s back if not approached correctly. Trends show the growing prominence of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities in improving projects, planning projects better, increasing impact and objectively measuring the impact that a project has had. A survey
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